Horszowksi Trio lives up to its namesake

I first became aware of the Horszowksi Trio through their performances on Dan Visconti’s “Lonesome Roads” release. There they played Visconti’s music with steely precision and a sense of urgency.

This release shows the trio in a different light. Their namesake, pianist Mieczyslaw Horszowksi had first-hand experience with the composers on this album. As a child prodigy he performed Fauré’s music for the composer. He also met Saint-Saëns, and was acquainted with Vincent D’Indy professionally.

Trio pianist Rieko Aizawa was one of Horszowksi’s last students, and an inheritor of his deep understanding of these French composers. An affinity shared by violinist Jesse Mills and cellist Raman Ramakrishan.

As an ensemble, they capture the essential Gaulic nature of this music. Saint-Saëns’ Trio No. 1 in F major is a pleasant, lyrical work. The trio seems to realize the richness of Saint-Saëns’ harmonies, making this a real sonic treat.

By contrast, Fauré’s Trio in D minor is more somber work. The strings adopt a darker tone, and the trio plays with just a hint of reserve that serves the music well.

d’Indy’s Trio No. 2 is a work that wears its heart on its sleeve, and the Horszowksi Trio is properly emotive. Despite the expressiveness of their playing, though, the trio maintains a clean, precise ensemble sound. The result is a pleasing balance between emotion and intellect.

Horszowski Trio: Fauré; Saint-Saëaut;ns; d’Indy
Camille Saint-Saëns: Trio No. 1 in F major, op. 18
Gabriel Fauré: Trio in D minor, Op. 120
Vincent d’Indy: Trio No. 2 in  forme de Suite in G major, Op. 98
Bridge Records 9441

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