Another vivacious double-dose …

Once again this week, I’ll have the joy of presenting Classical Cafe, serving up some delicious music to start your Thursday on just the right note.

The first hour features a well-known work, which is not, perhaps, aired quite so often, the Piano Concerto No. 3 by Beethoven: we have a sparkling version from the Mozarteum Orchestra of Salzburg.

Joseph_HaydnAt 7 am, we’ll have an oboe concerto that wasn’t written by Joseph Haydn, though many people think it was. It was, in fact, the work of Johann Antonin Kozeluch.

We’ll also enjoy a Piano Trio by Josef Rheinberger.

After 8 o’clock, we’ll hear a musical parody by Dmitri Shostakovich all about the challenging housing conditions in the Soviet Union of the 1950s in the Cheryomushki Suite, and we’ll end with the Concertone, which means big concert or concerto by Mozart.

There are plenty of delicious treats in store in the Classical Cafe, this Thursday morning. I hope you’ll join me.

On Vivace this Friday, the first hour features some peaceful music: the String Octet by Mendelssohn and a symphony by Vanhal.

capuzziAt 7 am, I’d like to introduce you to the music of Giuseppe Antonio Capuzzi, a largely-forgotten Italian violinist and composer who was born on August 1, 1755. We’ll hear his delightful Concerto for double bass and orchestra in D-Major.  After that, we have another equally delightful work: the Partita in C-Major for harp, flute and cello by Johann-Georg Albrechtsberger, who was a classmate of Michael Haydn, and taught music theory to Johann Hummel, Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Xaver Mozart.

Austrian composer and organist Hans Rott also has a birthday this Friday and of course, we’ll celebrate it, with his Pastoral Prelude in F Major. We’ll round out the hour with music of Gottfried Heinrich Stolzel.

baumannThe great horn player, Hermann Baumann (left), celebrates his 80th birthday this Friday. Before the champagne is opened, he will join us to play the Mozart Horn Concerto No. 2.

And we’ll end with one of those enchanting guitar and piano duos by Ferdinando Carulli.

I hope you’ll join me Thursday and Friday mornings, 6-9 am, to start your days with that touch of je ne sais quoi, here on WTJU-Charlottesville.

More Recent Posts

  • Devon Sproule on Around This Town, Nov 1

    Devon Sproule will stop by WTJU this Tuesday evening, November 1, around 5:30 (edt) for a visit ahead of her concert just two days later at The Southern in Charlottesville (details).

  • Legendary Paddy Keenan stops by WTJU, Oct 29

    World renowned master of the Irish uilleann pipes, and founding member of the influential Bothy Band, Paddy Keenan will stop by WTJU this Saturday morning, October 29, around 11 (edt) for a visit ahead of his Blue Ridge Irish Music School concert later that evening at C’Ville Coffee (details).

  • New Blues & Soul News – 10/27/2016

    New Blues & Soul News – 10/26/2016 David Bromberg Band – The Blues, The Whole Blues and Nothing But The Blues (Red House): Singer/songwriter/guitarist David Bromberg has been releasing recordings since 1971 and he’s still going strong. His voice shows the road wear, but given his comedic and/or talking style, that doesn’t interfere with his […]

  • Eli Cook Joins the Juddermeister Thursday October 27

    Eli Cook joins the Juddermeister on Induced to Judder this Thursday to talk about his upcoming Jimi Hendrix tribute show:”Bold as Love.” Tune in at 9pm to hear Eli and the Juddermeister play some Hendrix classics and talk about his November 4th performance at the IX Art Park. Bold as Love will include medleys, extended jams, […]

  • The Way Things Go for O’Connor and Kampmeier

    For flutist Tara Helen O’Connor, “The Way Things Go” is a labor of love. As she explains in the liner notes, she and pianist Margaret Kampmeier have taken several years to record the selections on this release. Five of the works were commissioned by O’Connor,the rest were compositions by the duo’s favorite composers. Perhaps because […]

  • Gustav Helsted – Decet, post-romantic goodness

    Just how progressive was Danish composer Gustav Helsted? Well, he founded a musical society that was playing Bruckner and Mahler symphonies in 1896. And while he studied with Niels Gade, Helsted was vitally interested pushing beyond Gade’s concept of romanticism — as his heroes Bruckner and Mahler had. Helsted’s Decet, Op. 18 for flute, oboe, […]